concurrent engineering

Anecdotal Evidence for the Use of Concurrent Engineering

Concurrent engineering is the practice of including manufacturing, purchasing, service and any other personnel outside of the design team in a project.  The so-called non-designers bring their unique perspective to the project in order to make it more usable, manufacture-able, source-able  serviceable, etc.  Of course the term non-designer is not true.  Anyone with input to the project …

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Requirements questions

A List of Questions to Ask When Writing Requirements

Generating a good set of system requirements involves asking a lot of questions.  What follows is a list of requirements questions to help spur the discussion.  Questioning may take the form of interviewing stakeholders, using questionnaires, or asking questions to yourself. The list of requirements questions below can be used as a framework to develop …

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Part symmetry

Using Part Symmetry, or Lack Thereof, to Your Advantage

When designing parts for assembly, part symmetry, or lack of symmetry, can be an important factor to consider.  In this article we look at when it’s appropriate to add part symmetry, and when asymmetry is a better option. Symmetrical Parts Designing symmetrical parts, weldments, and sub-assemblies can provide advantages such as reduction of unique parts, …

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Project Risk Analysis - Hanging Climber

Qualitative vs. Quantitative Project Risk Analysis – What’s the Difference?

As part of risk management, a project risk analysis is performed to assess the impact of risks and the probability of the risk occurrence.  In this article we will look at the differences between qualitative and quantitative project risk analysis. To see how project risk analysis fits within risk management, please refer to this article. …

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